This Is For You

groovy days

Hello loves, ❤

This is for the person with anxiety. For the one with dry eyes and big dreams and a relentless spirit. For the one that is their own worst enemy and their only friend. For the one that reading this has felt the tremor of every fleeting emotion and yet, feels nothing at all.

For the one that yearns to fill their days with explosions of love, hurricanes of passion and a rainfall of peace. For the one that knows that it doesn’t matter how slowly you go as long as you don’t stop, but how much longer and will they ever get there?

This is for the person whose pulse sometimes feels like a rocket headed for space but trapped in their body. The one that feels the vibration of every noise with every fiber of their being and it hurts, but they trusts that one day their body will learn— the danger is gone.

This is for the person that has spent too many a day on a battlefield with their thoughts — running away from them or tirelessly accepting, making promises or greeting threats.

Who has always taken a double portion of responsibility and twice the guilt because they live life in parallel. A life of endless dilemmas that tear you apart; a part of you is here but the other always somewhere far away in the realm of better possibilities.

This is for the person that sometimes feels utter exhaustion without having done a thing at all, because that’s what living in their head feels like.

For the one that has used up all of their energy to try and remain calm, and is now angry because they got mountains to climb, rivers to swim in and rainbows to walk over.

For the person that has tossed and turned and tossed and turned and there isn’t a cold corner of their bedsheets left that they can cling to. For the person who has jiggled with the threat of death in their head, while their body has faithfully carried on with the day.

For the person that is small and tiny but is actually a kingdom for three: their fear, their thoughts and their loving heart. And to the one that has spent most of their days trying to make it a harmonious trio.

For the person that knows this to be true, but refuses it to see it as a sad story. For they are not a victim. But is grateful instead for their chance to grow and become their own master. They still feel the bliss in every day and slows down to smell the roses. They never forget to thank God for every waking day. Yes, to you I want to say— I see you, I feel you, I believe in you.

Your darkness is my light. The places that scare you, the situations that dare you, they glare you. They make you real and living and true. How you build yourself over and over again, with the rise of dawn every morning despite what the night had brought, how you keep trying to accept yourself despite the voices that tell you, you are hard to love. How you hope against hope, and hold tight and always breathe new life to your extinguished fire — that to me is beauty and meaning and strength. You are the first star to appear оn the night sky and defy the darkness, you are the pearl oyster covered in stardust in the debris of the sea, you are the graceful ballerina that keeps on dancing on a tightrope despite her pain.

You know not what you do, but trust me if there is one thing that brings light to this world, it is you.

Wherever you are in the world, have a lovely day ❤

DYH Signature

RUOK Day

R U OK?’s vision is a world where we’re all connected and are protected from suicide.

Their mission is to inspire and empower everyone to meaningfully connect with people around them and support anyone struggling with life.
Their goals are to: 
1. Boost your confidence to meaningfully connect and ask about life’s ups and downs
2. Nurture your sense of responsibility to regularly connect and support others
3. Strengthen your sense of belonging because they know people are there for us
4. Be relevant, strong and dynamic.
Their Story:
In 1995, much-loved Barry Larkin was far from ok. His suicide left family and friends in deep grief and with endless questions. In 2009, his son Gavin Larkin chose to champion just one question to honour his father and to try and protect other families from the pain his endured.
“Are you ok?”
While collaborating with Janina Nearn on a documentary to raise awareness, the team quickly realised the documentary alone wouldn’t be enough.
To genuinely change behaviour Australia-wide, a national campaign was needed. And from this realisation, and with Gavin and Janina’s expertise and passion, R U OK? was born.
Gavin remained a passionate champion of the fact a conversation could change a life, even as cancer ended his in 2011.
His and Janina’s legacy is ensuring all Australians realise a little question can make a big difference to those people struggling with life.
Check in w/ those around you:
1. Ask ‘Are You Ok’
  • Be relaxed, friendly and concerned in your approach.
  • Help them open up by asking questions like “How are you going?” or “What’s been happening?”
  • Mention specific things that have made you concerned for them, like “You seem less chatty than usual. How are you going?”

2. Listen without judgement

  • Take what they say seriously and don’t interrupt or rush the conversation.
  • Don’t judge their experiences or reactions but acknowledge that things seem tough for them.
  • If they need time to think, sit patiently with the silence.
  • Encourage them to explain: “How are you feeling about that?” or “How long have you felt that way?”
  • Show that you’ve listened by repeating back what you’ve heard (in your own words) and ask if you have understood them properly.

3. Encourage action

  • Ask: “What have you done in the past to manage similar situations?”
  • Ask: “How would you like me to support you?”
  • Ask: “What’s something you can do for yourself right now? Something that’s enjoyable or relaxing?”
  • You could say: “When I was going through a difficult time, I tried this… You might find it useful too.”
  • If they’ve been feeling really down for more than 2 weeks, encourage them to see a health professional. You could say, “It might be useful to link in with someone who can support you. I’m happy to assist you to find the right person to talk to.”
  • Be positive about the role of professionals in getting through tough times.

4.  Check in

  • Pop a reminder in your diary to call them in a couple of weeks. If they’re really struggling, follow up with them sooner.
  • You could say: “I’ve been thinking of you and wanted to know how you’ve been going since we last chatted.”
  • Ask if they’ve found a better way to manage the situation. If they haven’t done anything, don’t judge them. They might just need someone to listen to them for the moment.
  • Stay in touch and be there for them. Genuine care and concern can make a real difference.

 

 

Just remember

You are not alone in this world, there are SO many people that are willing to help you through anything. Tough times don’t last forever & w/ a little bit of sunshine + rainbows, your dark storm will go away.

I promise, things do get better ❤

RUOK?

Wherever you are in the world, have a lovely day ❤

A, x (1)